FACE THE BEAUTY FACTOR

Real Estate

I am a firm believer in being comfortable in your own skin. Especially now that I have children, I want to be an advocate for being your true self, and appreciating all that you have to offer. In today’s society, it is so easy to get wrapped up in what we consider “perfection.” We have fillers, plumbers, surgeries, lasers, tattoos, creams, exercises, and all types of tools for enhancements to keep ourselves looking younger, thinner, and more appealing. It is very difficult to be in your late thirties and look like other women in their late fifties. If you are one of the people lucky enough to look as if you haven’t aged, and you have never had to have assistance in the aging process, consider yourself a winner in the lottery of genes! Yes, I want to be happy with myself, but when I look in the mirror and see wrinkles, sagging eye lids, crow’s feet, age spots, deepened lines all around, and rubbery skin, I begin to feel not so pretty. Wherever our self-conscious mind wanders, whether it's our weight, age, hair, ethnicity, color, class, or upbringing, we tend to really be more critical of those areas. It is all relative to where we live as to what our idea of perfection is; in many cultures, curvier people are looked upon as successful and wealthy (contrasting the US where most models are pressured to be too skinny to the point of being unhealthy), some cultures prefer lighter skin to dark (contrary to the US where we are constantly trying to tan), etc. You get the point. When a woman doesn’t feel amazing, it shows in everything she does. Confidence and success can specifically generate from how you feel and the power to create your own positive energy, outcome, and life in general. So here I am, thirty-seven, and I’m preparing for my third rhinoplasty and my first brow lift for in the morning. I have been getting fillers since I was twenty-nine. I had my first breast augmentation as soon as I turned eighteen and another only three years after to get them enlarged again. So can I be an advocate for being who you are? Can I encourage others to love the skin they’re in? Can I ethically convince my daughter that she is crazy when she wants to get her breasts enlarged at the young age of eighteen? Probably not! The best I can do is try to speak better about myself—not constantly deny compliments or complain about my weight. Show her that some things can be controlled with a little hard work like eating healthy, working out, and not drinking (haven’t gotten any better at this one yet) or doing drugs. As we all usually do, I want better for my children! I want them to treat themselves better than I have treated myself. I do want to love me from the inside out, and I kind of do…until I look in the mirror. I don’t know why I am so hard on myself; perhaps because my Mother has always been so hard on herself, and she’s beautiful. Not to mention, I never even believe when a stranger or my husband (or anyone for that matter) tells me I’m beautiful, because I don’t believe it myself. Last night we went to a work function to raise money for a great cause. We sat at a table with some wonderful new faces, and as I met them, a couple of the women complimented me so kindly—I don’t even know how to take compliments. It pains me to say it because I do hate to admit it! I am very good at acting confident! If you were to meet me, you might even call me stuck up, but let me tell you, you cannot judge a book by its cover! I am an open book though—I will tell you about me. I will tell you my story in hopes that I can help others, be more relatable, share empathy, be humbled, memories, healing, etc. That’s like writing…I love it because it is so therapeutic for me. I have had one crazy life—so much that people constantly tell me I should write a book, and maybe someday, I will actually finish the one I started from all of those suggestions. Sometimes one does not understand how much they’ve been through or how extreme situations actually were until they’re telling a story and people’s eyes widen and jaws drop. I am that person, and I try to tie in a bit of comedy because I love to make people laugh more than anything. That’s where I get all of these smile lines from. I should be proud of them because they show I am enthusiastic with my expressions. It should be consider beautiful just as stretch marks are showing that you carried a life. It is one of the greatest blessings in the world to have a baby. We should be thankful for those marks, wear them with pride, and embrace them and all that they convey! Many of us hide them, keep on cover-ups over our bathing suits, and cover them with makeup or some type of medical procedure. I sadly, am no exception. This is a moment when I will ask my daughter to do as I say and not as I do. Not ethically, but lovingly because she and my son will always be perfect to me! Namaste beautiful people (all of you are)…